A living lava lamp, someone calls these drifting hordes of glowy, gelatinous bulbs. But you can just call them what they are - jellyfish.

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They range from the northern sea nettle, with its lethal-looking tentacles, to the placid-looking moon jellies.

They’re not much beyond a stomach and reproductive organs. The ones with the classic dangly arms have the painful tentacles on the outside, laden with the stinging cells called nematocysts that shoot tiny harpoons at their prey. In the middle are the oral arms, long frilly appendages that draw the food up to the mouth.

Water in aquarium tanks is constantly cycled through a filtration system, with a screen to keep critters from getting sucked in. But, for a jellyfish, a screen is a calamity. They’re kept in round or oval tanks with a circular current that pushes them past the screen at an angle; while water leaves to be cleaned, the jellies flow on, their parts intact.

Keeping jellyfish is not for the faint of heart. There’s the special tank. The live food. And, periodically, you have to take all the jellyfish out and bleach the tank to kill the pesky little hydroids that hitchhike in, sting the jellies, and steal their food.

Well, in my book, that is exactly what justice is - they who sting will get stung! The food stealing thing is just a bonus (also kind of justice-doer’s reward)

The tanks worked great, except when a fish died or jumped out of the tank.
This was the call center of Freshwater Software, a now defunct company based in Boulder, Colorado. In 2000, the company commissioned this unique office design. The cubicles were not divided by fabric walls, but glass aquariums.
The Daily Mail quotes former employees, including Christina Gillman, who wrote: 

'We had many types of fish, ranging from Cichilds, catfish, tiger fish, menos, and much more.

The tanks worked great, except when a fish died or jumped out of the tank.

This was the call center of Freshwater Software, a now defunct company based in Boulder, Colorado. In 2000, the company commissioned this unique office design. The cubicles were not divided by fabric walls, but glass aquariums.

The Daily Mail quotes former employees, including Christina Gillman, who wrote: 

'We had many types of fish, ranging from Cichilds, catfish, tiger fish, menos, and much more.

highlineart

A Closer Look at Archeo: Josh Kline’s “Skittles”

highlineart:

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Josh Kline’s “Skittles,” part of the group exhibition Archeo, is an industrial refrigerator containing smoothies produced by the artist using unconventional and poetic combinations of ingredients, including kale chips, squid ink, sneakers, phone bills, and pepper spray. Each smoothie stands as a portrait of a different contemporary lifestyle. When grouped together, they evoke a landscape of aspiration, taste, and – at times – deprivation in a metropolis like New York City.

 Learn more about the ingredients:

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This post - the ingredients’ listing part, which is it’s essence - is, to me, some kind of Turing’s test, separating NYC crowd from the rest of Americans, and all the USA-living folks from the rest of us.

Half of the stuff in there - I have no idea what it even is, let alone what crowd it’s associated with, is it “in” or “out” and for which social group …

Am I so helplessly and hopelessly behind on life? …

Reddit’s window of virality

Have you ever wondered why most of the posts on Reddit’s front page are less than 12 hours old? Or why a post with a score of 4,000 is ranked below a 3,000-score post? It all has to do with Reddit’s window of virality.

Each post on Reddit has a score attached to it: score = upvotes – downvotes. Reddit’s “hotness” algorithm uses this score in combination with the post’s age to rank every single post on Reddit.

Amir Salihefendic wrote a fantastic post explaining the nitty-gritty of how Reddit’s hotness algorithm works, so I won’t bother repeating that here. Instead, I’ll jump right into the visualization showing us Reddit’s window of virality.

There’s more